Archive for the ‘UFOs’ Category

In need of finishing time

To think, just two months ago, I worried aloud medical school would rob me of every last bit of knitting time! On the contrary, I have far more time to knit now, but no time to think about my knitting: a fatal combination for a perfectionist knitter.

There’s even an almost finished sweater for me in that pile, probably buried near the bottom as it stews in Time Out – I am too annoyed to even discuss that one yet. Although I have plenty of time to knit while studying and sitting in lectures, I have little time to use my brain for things that do not relate to human anatomy (and I’m pretty sure fitting a sweater to a human form does not count in this respect). As you might expect, there have not been many successful projects around here: the three sweaters I swatched last week need different yarns, I have a stack of projects in need of button bands, buttons, or zippers, there’s a hat needing a lining, a baby sweater needing a fix involving a sewing machine and scissors, and several projects waiting on more yarn from the US Postal Service. Things will improve, but until they do, I will show you other people’s knitting, not mine.

Grumperina kindly sent one of her original Budgies to Odysseus, who, shall we say, fills things out quite nicely these days. I pulled it out of the drawer yesterday morning for him to wear on a walk, now that it’s cool in the mornings. Bonus? There are no buttons for him to attempt to eat. Odysseus is a big fan of grumperina knits! Thanks so much, Kathy!

Two of the striped sweaters in my unfinished knits pile are Budgies – it is such a perfect pattern for little ones who tug and pull buttons. I’m making two to use up some cotton stash and to knit for some new babies in my family. Only the zipper installations remain to be done. (Of course.)

O’s new Budgie conveniently matches his new Thorpe! Danielle spun and knitted both of my kids Thorpes for the winter. I think the hats are the same size, which is good, because O’s head is as big as his sister’s. Plus, he has long since outgrown the hat she made him last winter!

What I love about these hats is that they seem to come from so many knitterly people at once: the wool for the hat on the left is from Adrian (HelloYarn), the wool for the hat on the right is from Amy (SpunkyEclectic), the pattern is by Kirsten (Through The Loops), and the spinning and knitting by Danielle (aswiminknits).

Lastly, much to my surprise, a beautiful baby quilt arrived on my doorstep last week, sewed and quilted by my KBC friends.

The little boat on the back is embroidered with “S.S. OEB”, such a sweet personal touch for a little man named for a big sailor, don’t you think?

His chubbiness is lucky to know so many generous and talented crafters! As am I! Thanks so much, everyone!

Addictive knitting: Min Ulla scarf

Because of the new patterns I’ve put up this month, I feel as if I haven’t been blogging enough about my current knitting. The knitting interest I lost this summer is back, and my projects feel even more addicting than ever. I credit both the chill of autumn and not having any wool sweaters that fit over my gigantic belly with its return.

Min Ulla scarf

Like the hat I posted last week, this began as a Scandinavian-style sampler to test out some stitch patterns for a hat and scarf set I was planning. After a few inches, I thought it would make a nice edging for a simple, stockinette scarf. A foot into it, I decided to make the edging longer because it was so much fun to knit. Finally, I capitulated and eliminated all of the stockinette. You cannot imagine how addicting this knitting is! What is fascinating to me is that with the exception of four peeries, all of the patterns are so very simple: 2-, 4-, 8-, and 16-stitch repeats. So easy are they, in fact, that I have barely consulted my chart. And yet, the scarf looks impossibly complicated. Isn’t that wonderful? So little effort for so much effect!

Only 18 inches to go!

Although I have not been able to work on it consistently this month, I try to log a few peeries every day. I have about 18 inches to go. And then the hat. And maybe some mittens. Please, someone stop me!

Must. knit.

The scarf is knit in the round as a long tube for extra warmth.*

The only problem?

Don't drop a stitch holder down there

Hypothetically speaking, if one were to lose a stitch marker down that hole, there’s little hope of getting it back. Not that I would be so careless. Nope, not me.

Stay tuned for Min Ulla progress!

* Actually, I knit it in the round because I was far too lazy to purl back.

Winter accessory binge and Tapestry Mittens

As it has grown colder in the last few weeks, I have been thinking a lot about my problem with winter accessories. You know, once I get an idea in my head, I cannot get rid of it! I have sketched, swatched, and stashbusted – finally, I have a plan! I’ll share more once my yarn arrives. In the meantime, I can show you what did not work, for one reason or another.

Every winter, I fall into a stashbusting hat binge. So far, I’ve managed one adult hat and two newborn caps. I rediscovered why people make hats: they’re such quick knits! It seems unfair that I have to learn this lesson every year. I think there will be a few more of these, if only because they knit up so quickly and effectively use up annoying scraps lurking in my stash.

Stashbusting hats

Yarn: Knit Picks Wool of the Andes, Cascade 220, Debbie Bliss Merino Aran

Needles: US 7 (4.5 mm)

This project came closer to satisfying my criteria for the ultimate winter accessory knitting; however, the gauge was all wrong. Still, it’s a good prototype for what will come.

Prototype

Yarn: Harrisville New England Shetland

Needles: US 4 (3.5 mm)

Finally, speaking of winter accessories, I have a new pair of mittens in Interweave Knits Holiday 2009! The magazine will not be available until late October, but the preview was posted on Monday.

Tapestry-Mittens

Copyright Interweave Knits

Pattern: Tapestry Mittens (Ravelry link), smallest size shown

Yarn: Classic Elite Yarns Fresco in Rum Raisin (red) and Sterling (gray), Classic Elite Yarns Classic One Fifty in Berry (purple)

Needle: US 1.5 (2.5 mm) and US 4 (3.5 mm)

Copyright Interweave Knits

Copyright Interweave Knits

Relaxing Vine Lace

As other, more important project deadlines mounted a few weeks ago, I decided to cast on for some mindless knitting to help calm my nerves during a bought of insomnia. Some might find this a waste of already precious time; you know better, don’t you? 

 Swatching a spring project

As far as I am concerned, there is nothing quite like an easily memorized, repetitive pattern to cure insomnia.** Consequently, the body of this pullover knitted up in lightning speed; however, the sleeves languish partially finished as their master has recently rediscovered the merits of sleep.  

OK, maybe I'm at the armholes. Maybe.

The yarn is Harrisville Designs Shetland (in White), leftover from my Ivy League Vest last winter. The lace pattern is a 4-row repeat from Barbara Walker’s A Treasury of Knitting Patterns

Lace project

This is destined to become a scoopneck tunic with no waist shaping and as little sleeve shaping as possible, mostly because the combination of shaping and lace renders this no longer mindless. Perhaps that is a better reason for why the sleeves remain unknitted?

**Except when it doesn’t, and the knitter is forced – forced! - to stay up late to knit obsessively on a project about which she cares nothing. Ahem.

Down the rabbit hole

What started as a casual, ongoing, secondary project quickly grew into a terribly addicting, compelling project not long after I wrote about it.

Almost done with the knitting

It was bound to happen. I wanted my stashbusting vest to be a project to work on slowly throughout the year, adding scraps as they became available. Well, let’s face it: there is no shortage of Nature Spun Sport scraps in my house. Shortly after I posted about my Ultimate Stashbusting Vest, I felt a tremendous urge to FINISH! Right away! Sadly, a stranded vest with six colors and no repeated peeries requiring large amounts of math at regular intervals does not make for a good portable project. Alas! I have been dying to finish this for six weeks. Now, it is almost ready!

Down the rabbit hole

With the major knitting done, I steeked the vest yesterday and picked up stitches for the first armhole edging this morning. 
I can't stop

The other armhole and the neck edging remain to be done. Oh, and then there’s this little matter of weaving in ends…